Quality of well being in patients with fibromyalgia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The Quality of Well-being Scale (QWB) is a generic measure of health related quality of life that can be used for population monitoring, measurement of clinical outcomes, or cost effectiveness analysis. We report data on the validity of the QWB for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and compare the effect of FM to that of other chronic diseases.

METHODS: The participants were 594 people recruited from a private health maintenance organization with a confirmed diagnosis of FM. The QWB was administered, along with measures of self-rated health status, physical functioning, pain, stiffness, anxiety, sleep, and depression. The QWB places levels of wellness on a continuum ranging from 0.0 (for death or the equivalent of being dead) to 1.0 (for optimum functioning without symptoms).

RESULTS: Patients with FM had mean QWB scores of 0.559 (SD 0.074), which is lower than scores reported for patients in most other chronic disease categories. QWB was significantly correlated with measures of physical functioning, stiffness, anxiety, depression, pain, and sleep quality.

CONCLUSION: Evidence supports the validity of the QWB for patients with FM. Patients with FM obtain lower scores on the QWB than patients with diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, advanced cancer, and several other chronic diseases. Although FM is generally considered a syndrome rather than a disease, substantial disability is experienced by people with this diagnosis.

Details

Authors
External organisations
  • San Diego State University
Research areas and keywords

Keywords

  • Adult, Aged, Depression, Female, Fibromyalgia, Health Status, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pain, Quality of Life, Survival Analysis, Journal Article, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)785-9
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume27
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Mar
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes
Externally publishedYes