Respiratory tract deposition of inhaled roadside ultrafine refractory particles in a polluted megacity of South-East Asia

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Respiratory tract deposition of inhaled roadside ultrafine refractory particles in a polluted megacity of South-East Asia. / Kecorius, Simonas; Madueño, Leizel; Löndahl, Jakob; Vallar, Edgar; Galvez, Maria Cecilia; Idolor, Luisito F.; Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene; Müller, Thomas; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 663, 2019, p. 265-274.

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Kecorius, S, Madueño, L, Löndahl, J, Vallar, E, Galvez, MC, Idolor, LF, Gonzaga-Cayetano, M, Müller, T, Birmili, W & Wiedensohler, A 2019, 'Respiratory tract deposition of inhaled roadside ultrafine refractory particles in a polluted megacity of South-East Asia', Science of the Total Environment, vol. 663, pp. 265-274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.338

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Kecorius, Simonas ; Madueño, Leizel ; Löndahl, Jakob ; Vallar, Edgar ; Galvez, Maria Cecilia ; Idolor, Luisito F. ; Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene ; Müller, Thomas ; Birmili, Wolfram ; Wiedensohler, Alfred. / Respiratory tract deposition of inhaled roadside ultrafine refractory particles in a polluted megacity of South-East Asia. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2019 ; Vol. 663. pp. 265-274.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Respiratory tract deposition of inhaled roadside ultrafine refractory particles in a polluted megacity of South-East Asia

AU - Kecorius, Simonas

AU - Madueño, Leizel

AU - Löndahl, Jakob

AU - Vallar, Edgar

AU - Galvez, Maria Cecilia

AU - Idolor, Luisito F.

AU - Gonzaga-Cayetano, Mylene

AU - Müller, Thomas

AU - Birmili, Wolfram

AU - Wiedensohler, Alfred

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Recent studies demonstrate that Black Carbon (BC) pollution in economically developing megacities remain higher than the values, which the World Health Organization considers to be safe. Despite the scientific evidence of the degrees of BC exposure, there is still a lack of understanding on how the severe levels of BC pollution affect human health in these regions. We consider information on the respiratory tract deposition dose (DD) of BC to be essential in understanding the link between personal exposure to air pollutants and corresponding health effects. In this work, we combine data on fine and ultrafine refractory particle number concentrations (BC proxy), and activity patterns to derive the respiratory tract deposited amounts of BC particles for the population of the highly polluted metropolitan area of Manila, Philippines. We calculated the total DD of refractory particles based on three metrics: refractory particle number, surface area, and mass concentrations. The calculated DD of total refractory particle number in Metro Manila was found to be 1.6 to 17 times higher than average values reported from Europe and the U.S. In the case of Manila, ultrafine particles smaller than 100 nm accounted for more than 90% of the total deposited refractory particle dose in terms of particle number. This work is a first attempt to quantitatively evaluate the DD of refractory particles and raise awareness in assessing pollution-related health effects in developing megacities. We demonstrate that the majority of the population may be highly affected by BC pollution, which is known to have negative health outcomes if no actions are taken to mitigate its emission. For the governments of such metropolitan areas, we suggest to revise currently existing environmental legislation, raise public awareness, and to establish supplementary monitoring of black carbon in parallel to already existing PM10 and PM2.5 measures.

AB - Recent studies demonstrate that Black Carbon (BC) pollution in economically developing megacities remain higher than the values, which the World Health Organization considers to be safe. Despite the scientific evidence of the degrees of BC exposure, there is still a lack of understanding on how the severe levels of BC pollution affect human health in these regions. We consider information on the respiratory tract deposition dose (DD) of BC to be essential in understanding the link between personal exposure to air pollutants and corresponding health effects. In this work, we combine data on fine and ultrafine refractory particle number concentrations (BC proxy), and activity patterns to derive the respiratory tract deposited amounts of BC particles for the population of the highly polluted metropolitan area of Manila, Philippines. We calculated the total DD of refractory particles based on three metrics: refractory particle number, surface area, and mass concentrations. The calculated DD of total refractory particle number in Metro Manila was found to be 1.6 to 17 times higher than average values reported from Europe and the U.S. In the case of Manila, ultrafine particles smaller than 100 nm accounted for more than 90% of the total deposited refractory particle dose in terms of particle number. This work is a first attempt to quantitatively evaluate the DD of refractory particles and raise awareness in assessing pollution-related health effects in developing megacities. We demonstrate that the majority of the population may be highly affected by BC pollution, which is known to have negative health outcomes if no actions are taken to mitigate its emission. For the governments of such metropolitan areas, we suggest to revise currently existing environmental legislation, raise public awareness, and to establish supplementary monitoring of black carbon in parallel to already existing PM10 and PM2.5 measures.

KW - Air pollution

KW - Black carbon

KW - Exposure

KW - Lung-particle interaction

KW - Respiratory tract deposition

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.338

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.01.338

M3 - Article

VL - 663

SP - 265

EP - 274

JO - Science of the Total Environment

T2 - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 1879-1026

ER -