Role of fractalkine-CX3CR1 pathway in seizure-induced microglial activation, neurodegeneration, and neuroblast production in the adult rat brain.

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T1 - Role of fractalkine-CX3CR1 pathway in seizure-induced microglial activation, neurodegeneration, and neuroblast production in the adult rat brain.

AU - Ali, Idrish

AU - Chugh, Deepti

AU - Ekdahl Clementson, Christine

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Temporal lobe seizures lead to an acute inflammatory response in the brain primarily characterized by activation of parenchymal microglial cells. Simultaneously, degeneration of pyramidal cells and interneurons is evident together with a seizure-induced increase in the production of new neurons within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. We have previously shown a negative correlation between the acute seizure-induced inflammation and the survival of newborn hippocampal neurons. Here, we aimed to evaluate the role of the fractalkine-CX3CR1 pathway for these acute events. Fractalkine is a chemokine expressed by both neurons and glia, while its receptor, CX3CR1 is primarily expressed on microglia. Electrically-induced partial status epilepticus (SE) was induced in adult rats through stereotaxically implanted electrodes in the hippocampus. Recombinant rat fractalkine or CX3CR1 antibody was infused intraventricularly during one week post-SE. A significant increase in the expression of CX3CR1, but not fractalkine, was observed in the dentate gyrus at one week. CX3CR1 antibody treatment resulted in a reduction in microglial activation, neurodegeneration, as well as neuroblast production. In contrast, fractalkine treatment had only minor effects. This study provides evidence for a role of the fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling pathway in seizure-induced microglial activation and suggests that neuroblast production following seizures may partly occur as a result of microglial activation.

AB - Temporal lobe seizures lead to an acute inflammatory response in the brain primarily characterized by activation of parenchymal microglial cells. Simultaneously, degeneration of pyramidal cells and interneurons is evident together with a seizure-induced increase in the production of new neurons within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. We have previously shown a negative correlation between the acute seizure-induced inflammation and the survival of newborn hippocampal neurons. Here, we aimed to evaluate the role of the fractalkine-CX3CR1 pathway for these acute events. Fractalkine is a chemokine expressed by both neurons and glia, while its receptor, CX3CR1 is primarily expressed on microglia. Electrically-induced partial status epilepticus (SE) was induced in adult rats through stereotaxically implanted electrodes in the hippocampus. Recombinant rat fractalkine or CX3CR1 antibody was infused intraventricularly during one week post-SE. A significant increase in the expression of CX3CR1, but not fractalkine, was observed in the dentate gyrus at one week. CX3CR1 antibody treatment resulted in a reduction in microglial activation, neurodegeneration, as well as neuroblast production. In contrast, fractalkine treatment had only minor effects. This study provides evidence for a role of the fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling pathway in seizure-induced microglial activation and suggests that neuroblast production following seizures may partly occur as a result of microglial activation.

U2 - 10.1016/j.nbd.2014.11.009

DO - 10.1016/j.nbd.2014.11.009

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 194

EP - 203

JO - Neurobiology of Disease

T2 - Neurobiology of Disease

JF - Neurobiology of Disease

SN - 0969-9961

ER -