See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research. / Tucker, R P; Henningsson, Per; Franklin, S L; Chen, D; Ventikos, Y; Bomphrey, R J; Thompson, M S.

In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Vol. 11, No. 97, 20140330, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Tucker, RP, Henningsson, P, Franklin, SL, Chen, D, Ventikos, Y, Bomphrey, RJ & Thompson, MS 2014, 'See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research.', Journal of the Royal Society Interface, vol. 11, no. 97, 20140330. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0330

APA

Tucker, R. P., Henningsson, P., Franklin, S. L., Chen, D., Ventikos, Y., Bomphrey, R. J., & Thompson, M. S. (2014). See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 11(97), [20140330]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0330

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Tucker, R P ; Henningsson, Per ; Franklin, S L ; Chen, D ; Ventikos, Y ; Bomphrey, R J ; Thompson, M S. / See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research. In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 97.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - See-saw rocking: an in vitro model for mechanotransduction research.

AU - Tucker, R P

AU - Henningsson, Per

AU - Franklin, S L

AU - Chen, D

AU - Ventikos, Y

AU - Bomphrey, R J

AU - Thompson, M S

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - In vitro mechanotransduction studies, uncovering the basic science of the response of cells to mechanical forces, are essential for progress in tissue engineering and its clinical application. Many varying investigations have described a multitude of cell responses; however, as the precise nature and magnitude of the stresses applied are infrequently reported and rarely validated, the experiments are often not comparable, limiting research progress. This paper provides physical and biological validation of a widely available fluid stimulation device, a see-saw rocker, as an in vitro model for cyclic fluid shear stress mechanotransduction. This allows linkage between precisely characterized stimuli and cell monolayer response in a convenient six-well plate format. Models of one well were discretized and analysed extensively using computational fluid dynamics to generate convergent, stable and consistent predictions of the cyclic fluid velocity vectors at a rocking frequency of 0.5 Hz, accounting for the free surface. Validation was provided by comparison with flow velocities measured experimentally using particle image velocimetry. Qualitative flow behaviour was matched and quantitative analysis showed agreement at representative locations and time points. Maximum shear stress of 0.22 Pa was estimated near the well edge, and time-average shear stress ranged between 0.029 and 0.068 Pa. Human tenocytes stimulated using the system showed significant increases in collagen and GAG secretion at 2 and 7 day time points. This in vitro model for mechanotransduction provides a versatile, flexible and inexpensive method for the fluid shear stress impact on biological cells to be studied.

AB - In vitro mechanotransduction studies, uncovering the basic science of the response of cells to mechanical forces, are essential for progress in tissue engineering and its clinical application. Many varying investigations have described a multitude of cell responses; however, as the precise nature and magnitude of the stresses applied are infrequently reported and rarely validated, the experiments are often not comparable, limiting research progress. This paper provides physical and biological validation of a widely available fluid stimulation device, a see-saw rocker, as an in vitro model for cyclic fluid shear stress mechanotransduction. This allows linkage between precisely characterized stimuli and cell monolayer response in a convenient six-well plate format. Models of one well were discretized and analysed extensively using computational fluid dynamics to generate convergent, stable and consistent predictions of the cyclic fluid velocity vectors at a rocking frequency of 0.5 Hz, accounting for the free surface. Validation was provided by comparison with flow velocities measured experimentally using particle image velocimetry. Qualitative flow behaviour was matched and quantitative analysis showed agreement at representative locations and time points. Maximum shear stress of 0.22 Pa was estimated near the well edge, and time-average shear stress ranged between 0.029 and 0.068 Pa. Human tenocytes stimulated using the system showed significant increases in collagen and GAG secretion at 2 and 7 day time points. This in vitro model for mechanotransduction provides a versatile, flexible and inexpensive method for the fluid shear stress impact on biological cells to be studied.

U2 - 10.1098/rsif.2014.0330

DO - 10.1098/rsif.2014.0330

M3 - Article

C2 - 24898022

VL - 11

JO - Journal of the Royal Society Interface

JF - Journal of the Royal Society Interface

SN - 1742-5662

IS - 97

M1 - 20140330

ER -