Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging

Research output: Working paper

Standard

Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. / Wallin, Claes.

Packaging Logistics, Lund University, 2003.

Research output: Working paper

Harvard

Wallin, C 2003 'Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging' Packaging Logistics, Lund University.

APA

Wallin, C. (2003). Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. Packaging Logistics, Lund University.

CBE

Wallin C. 2003. Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. Packaging Logistics, Lund University.

MLA

Wallin, Claes Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. Packaging Logistics, Lund University. 2003.,

Vancouver

Wallin C. Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. Packaging Logistics, Lund University. 2003.

Author

Wallin, Claes. / Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging. Packaging Logistics, Lund University, 2003.

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging

AU - Wallin, Claes

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - In trying to get products out to market, manufacturers of FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) differentiate themselves through e.g. promotional efforts and display packaging (Point-of-Purchase packaging). For the display packaging, companies turn to contract packagers who are able to supply this service, providing the design, manufacturing and assembly and packing of the display packaging. This paper discusses the implications of contract packaging for a supply chain, specifically through the case of a provider of contract packaging and a supportive case that describes the experiences acquired from a relationship between P&G and Exel. The paper also offers a discussion on what actors are supplying contract packaging, presenting advantages of the individual actors. The implication that were found include the possibility of lower time -to-market, the possibility to postpone manufacturing, and increasing flexibility in the manufacturing of the displays and the offer that can be provided to customers.

AB - In trying to get products out to market, manufacturers of FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) differentiate themselves through e.g. promotional efforts and display packaging (Point-of-Purchase packaging). For the display packaging, companies turn to contract packagers who are able to supply this service, providing the design, manufacturing and assembly and packing of the display packaging. This paper discusses the implications of contract packaging for a supply chain, specifically through the case of a provider of contract packaging and a supportive case that describes the experiences acquired from a relationship between P&G and Exel. The paper also offers a discussion on what actors are supplying contract packaging, presenting advantages of the individual actors. The implication that were found include the possibility of lower time -to-market, the possibility to postpone manufacturing, and increasing flexibility in the manufacturing of the displays and the offer that can be provided to customers.

M3 - Working paper

BT - Supply Chain Implications from Conract Packaging

PB - Packaging Logistics, Lund University

ER -