The congenital disorders of glycosylation: a multifaceted group of syndromes.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly expanding group of metabolic syndromes with a wide symptomatology and severity. They all stem from deficient N-glycosylation of proteins. To date the group contains 18 different subtypes: 12 of Type I (disrupted synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor) and 6 of Type II (malfunctioning trimming/processing of the protein-bound oligosaccharide). Main features of CDG involve psychomotor retardation; ataxia; seizures; retinopathy; liver fibrosis; coagulopathies; failure to thrive; dysmorphic features, including inverted nipples and subcutaneous fat pads; and strabismus. No treatment currently is available for the vast majority of these syndromes (CDG-Ib and CDG-IIc are exceptions), even though attempts to synthesize drugs for the most common subtype, CDG-Ia, have been made. In this review we will discuss the individual syndromes, with focus on their neuronal involvement, available and possible treatments, and future directions.

Details

Authors
  • Erik Eklund
  • Hudson H Freeze
Organisations
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Cell and Molecular Biology

Keywords

  • N-glycosylation, CDG, mannose, synthetic compounds, brain glycosylation, ataxia, cerebellar hypoplasia, seizures
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-63
JournalNeuroRx
Volume3
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

Bibliographic note

The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Cell and Matrix Biology (LUR000002), Matrix biology (013212025)