The Drivers of Long-run CO₂ emissions in Europe, North America and Japan since 1800

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The Drivers of Long-run CO₂ emissions in Europe, North America and Japan since 1800. / Henriques, Sofia; Borowiecki, Karol.

In: Energy Policy, Vol. 101, 02.2017, p. 537-549.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - The Drivers of Long-run CO₂ emissions in Europe, North America and Japan since 1800

AU - Henriques, Sofia

AU - Borowiecki, Karol

PY - 2017/2

Y1 - 2017/2

N2 - Using an extended Kaya decomposition, we identify the drivers of long-run CO₂ emissions since 1800 for Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, the UK, the United States, Canada and Japan. By considering biomass and carbon-free energy sources along with fossil fuels, we are able to shed light on the effects of past and present energy transitions on CO₂ emissions. We find that at low levels of income per capita, fuel switching from biomass to fossil fuels is the main contributing factor to emissions growth. As income levels increase, scale effects, especially income effects, become dominant. Technological change proves to be the main offsetting factor in the long run. Particularly in the last decades, technological change and fuel switching have become important contributors to the decrease in emissions in Europe. Our results also contrast the differentiated historical paths of CO₂ emissions taken by these countries.

AB - Using an extended Kaya decomposition, we identify the drivers of long-run CO₂ emissions since 1800 for Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, the UK, the United States, Canada and Japan. By considering biomass and carbon-free energy sources along with fossil fuels, we are able to shed light on the effects of past and present energy transitions on CO₂ emissions. We find that at low levels of income per capita, fuel switching from biomass to fossil fuels is the main contributing factor to emissions growth. As income levels increase, scale effects, especially income effects, become dominant. Technological change proves to be the main offsetting factor in the long run. Particularly in the last decades, technological change and fuel switching have become important contributors to the decrease in emissions in Europe. Our results also contrast the differentiated historical paths of CO₂ emissions taken by these countries.

KW - carbon emissions

KW - decomposition analysis

KW - energy transition

KW - biomass

UR - https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85006757465&origin=inward&txGid=02F299BBCE857C282D32592D376C696E.wsnAw8kcdt7IPYLO0V48gA%3a130

U2 - 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.005

DO - 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.005

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 537

EP - 549

JO - Energy Policy

JF - Energy Policy

SN - 0301-4215

ER -