The relationship between longitudinal, lateral, and septal contribution to stroke volume in patients with pulmonary regurgitation and healthy volunteers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between longitudinal, lateral, and septal contribution to stroke volume in patients with pulmonary regurgitation and healthy volunteers

AU - Stephensen, Sigurdur Sverrir

AU - Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina

AU - Munkhammar, Peter

AU - Heiberg, Einar

AU - Arheden, Håkan

AU - Carlsson, Marcus

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Septal systolic motion is towards the left ventricle (LV) in healthy hearts. Patients with pulmonary regurgitation (PR) and right ventricular (RV) volume overload have systolic septal motion toward the RV. This may affect the longitudinal contribution from atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) and septal and lateral contribution to stroke volume (SV). The study aimed to quantify these contributions to SV in patients with PR. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used for assessment of cardiac volumes. Patients (n = 30; age 9-59 yr) with PR due to surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot and 54 healthy controls (age 10-66 yr) were studied. Longitudinal contribution to RVSV was 47 +/- 2% (means +/- SE) in patients with PR and 79 +/- 1% in controls (P < 0.001). Lateral contribution to RVSV and LVSV was 40 +/- 1 and 62 +/- 2% in patients and 31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1% in controls (P < 0.001 for both). Septal motion contributed to RVSV by 8 +/- 1% in patients and by 7 +/- 1% to LVSV in controls (P < 0.001). PR patients have decreased longitudinal contribution to RVSV and increased lateral pumping, resulting in larger outer volume changes and septal motion towards the RV. The changes in RV pumping physiology may be explained by RV remodeling resulting in lower systolic inflow of blood into the right atrium in relation to SV. This avoids the development of pendulum volume between the caval veins and right atrium, which would occur in PR patients if longitudinal contribution to SV was preserved. Decreased AVPD suggests that tricuspid annular excursion, a marker of RV function, is less valid in these patients.

AB - Septal systolic motion is towards the left ventricle (LV) in healthy hearts. Patients with pulmonary regurgitation (PR) and right ventricular (RV) volume overload have systolic septal motion toward the RV. This may affect the longitudinal contribution from atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) and septal and lateral contribution to stroke volume (SV). The study aimed to quantify these contributions to SV in patients with PR. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was used for assessment of cardiac volumes. Patients (n = 30; age 9-59 yr) with PR due to surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot and 54 healthy controls (age 10-66 yr) were studied. Longitudinal contribution to RVSV was 47 +/- 2% (means +/- SE) in patients with PR and 79 +/- 1% in controls (P < 0.001). Lateral contribution to RVSV and LVSV was 40 +/- 1 and 62 +/- 2% in patients and 31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1% in controls (P < 0.001 for both). Septal motion contributed to RVSV by 8 +/- 1% in patients and by 7 +/- 1% to LVSV in controls (P < 0.001). PR patients have decreased longitudinal contribution to RVSV and increased lateral pumping, resulting in larger outer volume changes and septal motion towards the RV. The changes in RV pumping physiology may be explained by RV remodeling resulting in lower systolic inflow of blood into the right atrium in relation to SV. This avoids the development of pendulum volume between the caval veins and right atrium, which would occur in PR patients if longitudinal contribution to SV was preserved. Decreased AVPD suggests that tricuspid annular excursion, a marker of RV function, is less valid in these patients.

KW - septal motion

KW - radial and longitudinal function

KW - pulmonary

KW - regurgitation

KW - RV volume load

U2 - 10.1152/ajpheart.00483.2013

DO - 10.1152/ajpheart.00483.2013

M3 - Article

VL - 306

SP - H895-H903

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

T2 - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 1522-1539

IS - 6

ER -