'There's something in their eyes' - Child Health Services nurses' experiences of identifying signs of postpartum depression in non-Swedish-speaking immigrant mothers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Due to the current world situation, Sweden has one of the highest asylum applications within the European Union. Immigrant mothers, specifically those who have immigrated during the last ten years and do not speak the language of the new country, are found to be at particular risk of being effected by postpartum depression.

AIM: In this study, we elucidate Swedish Child Health Services nurses' experiences of identifying signs of postpartum depression in non-Swedish-speaking immigrant mothers.

METHODS: Latent content analysis was used when analysing data material from 13 research interviews.

RESULTS: Being able to interpret a non-Swedish-speaking immigrant mother's mood required establishing and constant deepening of a transcultural caring relationship, the use of cultural knowledge to perceive signs of postpartum depression from observations and interactions and to rely on intuition.

CONCLUSION: There are both challenges and key factors for success in interpreting the mood of non-Swedish-speaking immigrant mothers.

IMPLICATIONS: This study provides information to healthcare professionals about challenges with adapting the screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to immigrant mothers not speaking the language of residence. Tacit knowledge and cultural competence among healthcare personnel are invaluable assets when interpreting mental health in this vulnerable group of mothers.

Details

Authors
Organisations
External organisations
  • Region Skåne
Research areas and keywords

Subject classification (UKÄ) – MANDATORY

  • Nursing

Keywords

  • Journal Article
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)739–747
Number of pages9
JournalScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Volume31
Issue number4
Early online date2017 Jan 25
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec
Publication categoryResearch
Peer-reviewedYes

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