White matter microstructure predicts foreign language learning in army interpreters

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White matter microstructure predicts foreign language learning in army interpreters. / Mårtensson, Johan; Eriksson, Johan; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Lindgren, Magnus; Johansson, Mikael; Nyberg, Lars; Lövdén, Martin.

In: Bilingualism, Vol. 23, No. 4, 08.2020, p. 763-771.

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Mårtensson, Johan ; Eriksson, Johan ; Bodammer, Nils Christian ; Lindgren, Magnus ; Johansson, Mikael ; Nyberg, Lars ; Lövdén, Martin. / White matter microstructure predicts foreign language learning in army interpreters. In: Bilingualism. 2020 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 763-771.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - White matter microstructure predicts foreign language learning in army interpreters

AU - Mårtensson, Johan

AU - Eriksson, Johan

AU - Bodammer, Nils Christian

AU - Lindgren, Magnus

AU - Johansson, Mikael

AU - Nyberg, Lars

AU - Lövdén, Martin

PY - 2020/8

Y1 - 2020/8

N2 - Adult foreign language acquisition is challenging, and the degree of success varies among individuals. Anatomical differences in brain structure prior to training can partly explain why some learn more than others. We followed a sample of conscript interpreters undergoing intense language training to study learning-related changes in white-matter microstructure (FA, MD, RD and AD) and associations between differences in brain structure prior to training with acquired language proficiency. No evidence for changes in white matter microstructure relative to a control group was found. Starting values of RD, AD and MD were positively related to final test scores of language proficiency, corroborating earlier findings in the field and highlighting the need for further study of how initial brain structure influences and interacts with learning outcomes.

AB - Adult foreign language acquisition is challenging, and the degree of success varies among individuals. Anatomical differences in brain structure prior to training can partly explain why some learn more than others. We followed a sample of conscript interpreters undergoing intense language training to study learning-related changes in white-matter microstructure (FA, MD, RD and AD) and associations between differences in brain structure prior to training with acquired language proficiency. No evidence for changes in white matter microstructure relative to a control group was found. Starting values of RD, AD and MD were positively related to final test scores of language proficiency, corroborating earlier findings in the field and highlighting the need for further study of how initial brain structure influences and interacts with learning outcomes.

KW - diffusion tensor imaging

KW - interpreting

KW - language acquisition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85081306968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1366728920000152

DO - 10.1017/S1366728920000152

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85081306968

VL - 23

SP - 763

EP - 771

JO - Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

JF - Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

SN - 1366-7289

IS - 4

ER -