A new subfamily of major intrinsic proteins in plants.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Abstract

The major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) form a large protein family of ancient origin and are found in bacteria, fungi, animals, and plants. MIPs act as channels in membranes to facilitate passive transport across the membrane. Some MIPs allow small polar molecules like glycerol or urea to pass through the membrane. However, the majority of MIPs are thought to be aquaporins (AQPs), i.e., they are specific for water transport. Plant MIPs can be subdivided into the plasma membrane intrinsic protein, tonoplast intrinsic protein, and NOD26-like intrinsic protein subfamilies. By database mining and phylogenetic analyses, we have identified a new subfamily in plants, the Small basic Intrinsic Proteins (SIPs). Comparisons of sequences from the new subfamily with conserved amino acid residues in other MIPs reveal characteristic features of SIPs. Possible functional consequences of these features are discussed in relation to the recently solved structures of AQP1 and GlpF. We suggest that substitutions at conserved and structurally important positions imply a different substrate specificity for the new subfamily.

Detaljer

Författare
Enheter & grupper
Forskningsområden

Ämnesklassifikation (UKÄ) – OBLIGATORISK

  • Biologiska vetenskaper

Nyckelord

Originalspråkengelska
Sidor (från-till)456-461
TidskriftMolecular biology and evolution
Volym19
Utgivningsnummer4
StatusPublished - 2002
PublikationskategoriForskning
Peer review utfördJa