Adolescent respiratory symptoms-girls are at risk: The Young-HUNT study, Norway

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Adolescent respiratory symptoms-girls are at risk: The Young-HUNT study, Norway. / Tollefsen, E; Bjermer, Leif; Langhammer, A; Johnsen, R; Holmen, TL.

I: Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 100, Nr. 3, 2006, s. 471-476.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

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Tollefsen, E ; Bjermer, Leif ; Langhammer, A ; Johnsen, R ; Holmen, TL. / Adolescent respiratory symptoms-girls are at risk: The Young-HUNT study, Norway. I: Respiratory Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 100, Nr. 3. s. 471-476.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescent respiratory symptoms-girls are at risk: The Young-HUNT study, Norway

AU - Tollefsen, E

AU - Bjermer, Leif

AU - Langhammer, A

AU - Johnsen, R

AU - Holmen, TL

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - The objective was to study sex differences in adolescence regarding prevalence of asthma and current wheeze and to explore the association between respiratory symptoms and hereditary, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Young-HUNT included data comprehensive questionnaire on health, disease, lifestyle and social factors from 8817 teenagers 13-19 years conducted in 1995/97 (89% response rate). Questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC). In age groups 13-16 and 17-19 years, current wheeze was reported by 29.0% and 33.5% among girls and 20.4% and 22.1% among boys, whilst the corresponding figures for asthma were 8.5% and 12.2% among girls and 7.1% and 7.0% among boys. Both wheeze and asthma were significantly more prevalent and increased with age in girls compared to boys. Heredity was associated with asthma, but the association was strongest between parents and children of the same sex. Environmental smoking was associated with asthma and wheeze in girls only. Girls reported more asthma and wheeze in association with overweight compared to boys. Girls reported more wheeze and asthma than boys and seemed more susceptible to risk factors such as environmental smoking and overweight than boys. Moreover, girls with mothers having asthma were more likely to be diagnosed as asthmatics themselves. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - The objective was to study sex differences in adolescence regarding prevalence of asthma and current wheeze and to explore the association between respiratory symptoms and hereditary, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Young-HUNT included data comprehensive questionnaire on health, disease, lifestyle and social factors from 8817 teenagers 13-19 years conducted in 1995/97 (89% response rate). Questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC). In age groups 13-16 and 17-19 years, current wheeze was reported by 29.0% and 33.5% among girls and 20.4% and 22.1% among boys, whilst the corresponding figures for asthma were 8.5% and 12.2% among girls and 7.1% and 7.0% among boys. Both wheeze and asthma were significantly more prevalent and increased with age in girls compared to boys. Heredity was associated with asthma, but the association was strongest between parents and children of the same sex. Environmental smoking was associated with asthma and wheeze in girls only. Girls reported more asthma and wheeze in association with overweight compared to boys. Girls reported more wheeze and asthma than boys and seemed more susceptible to risk factors such as environmental smoking and overweight than boys. Moreover, girls with mothers having asthma were more likely to be diagnosed as asthmatics themselves. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - sex differences

KW - adolescence

KW - prevalence

KW - risk factors

KW - asthma

U2 - 10.1016/j.rmed.2005.06.007

DO - 10.1016/j.rmed.2005.06.007

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 471

EP - 476

JO - Respiratory Medicine

JF - Respiratory Medicine

SN - 1532-3064

IS - 3

ER -