Coping and suicide risk in high risk psychiatric patients

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Standard

Coping and suicide risk in high risk psychiatric patients. / Ambrus, Livia; Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Asp, Marie; Westling, Sofie; Westrin, Åsa.

I: Journal of Mental Health, Vol. 29, Nr. 1, 2020, s. 27-32.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coping and suicide risk in high risk psychiatric patients

AU - Ambrus, Livia

AU - Sunnqvist, Charlotta

AU - Asp, Marie

AU - Westling, Sofie

AU - Westrin, Åsa

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: A dysfunctional use of coping strategies has repeatedly been linked to suicidal behaviour in non-psychiatric populations. However, data regarding association between coping strategies and suicidal behaviour in psychiatric populations are limited. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the possible relationship between self-reported suicide risk, suicidal ideation and coping strategies in three psychiatric cohorts. Method: Three cohorts of psychiatric patients were involved in the study; recent suicide attempters (n = 55), suicide attempters at follow-up 12 years after a suicide attempt (n = 38) and patients with ongoing depression without attempted suicide (n = 72). Patients filled in the self-rating version of The Suicide Assessment Scale (SUAS-S) from which items no. 17–20 addressing current suicidal ideation were extracted. To investigate coping strategies, the Coping Orientation of Problem Experience Inventory (COPE) was used. Results: In all cohorts, regression analyses showed that only avoidant coping was significantly correlated with the scores of SUAS-S adjusted for covariates. The items no. 17–20 correlated significantly to avoidant coping but not with other coping strategies in all cohorts. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that among coping strategies only avoidant coping may be associated with suicide risk in psychiatric patients independently of history of attempted suicide.

AB - Background: A dysfunctional use of coping strategies has repeatedly been linked to suicidal behaviour in non-psychiatric populations. However, data regarding association between coping strategies and suicidal behaviour in psychiatric populations are limited. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the possible relationship between self-reported suicide risk, suicidal ideation and coping strategies in three psychiatric cohorts. Method: Three cohorts of psychiatric patients were involved in the study; recent suicide attempters (n = 55), suicide attempters at follow-up 12 years after a suicide attempt (n = 38) and patients with ongoing depression without attempted suicide (n = 72). Patients filled in the self-rating version of The Suicide Assessment Scale (SUAS-S) from which items no. 17–20 addressing current suicidal ideation were extracted. To investigate coping strategies, the Coping Orientation of Problem Experience Inventory (COPE) was used. Results: In all cohorts, regression analyses showed that only avoidant coping was significantly correlated with the scores of SUAS-S adjusted for covariates. The items no. 17–20 correlated significantly to avoidant coping but not with other coping strategies in all cohorts. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that among coping strategies only avoidant coping may be associated with suicide risk in psychiatric patients independently of history of attempted suicide.

KW - attempted suicide

KW - avoidant coping

KW - Coping

KW - suicide risk

U2 - 10.1080/09638237.2017.1417547

DO - 10.1080/09638237.2017.1417547

M3 - Article

C2 - 29260914

VL - 29

SP - 27

EP - 32

JO - Journal of Mental Health

JF - Journal of Mental Health

SN - 1360-0567

IS - 1

ER -