Experiments suggesting extra-digestive effects of enteral pancreatic amylase and its peptides on glucose homeostasis in a pig model

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Abstract

The studies presented were designed to highlight the impact of pancreatic enzymes on glycemic control and insulin response. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were monitored after intravenous, oral or direct gut glucose tolerance tests (GTT) in 6 pigs with an intact gastrointestinal tract and in 12 pigs following duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery. In the intact pigs, pancreatic enzymes (Creon®) given orally 1 h prior to the GTT, lowered the blood glucose levels during the oral and meal GTT and reduced the plasma insulin response during the intravenous and meal GTT. In DJB pigs, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were higher following glucose loading into the by-passed biliopancreatic limb as compared to that following glucose loading orally or into the common intestinal limb. Infusion of amylase or amylase peptides together with glucose into the biliopancreatic limb lowered blood glucose levels in DJB pigs. These preliminary data suggest new, extra-digestive, actions of enteral pancreatic enzymes - probably amylase or its peptides - on glucose homeostasis, with an reduction in net glucose absorption into the blood and in insulin response. This ability of digestive enzymes (amylase) to reduce post-prandial hyperglycaemia in an insulin-independent manner could aid in preventing the development of obesity and diabetes.

Detaljer

Författare
Enheter & grupper
Externa organisationer
  • Innovation Centre STB
  • Institute of Rural Medicine, Lublin
  • Anara AB
  • Kielanowski Institute of Animal Physiology and Nutrition
  • Vasyl Stefanyk Precarpathian National University
  • Abbott Laboratories GmbH
  • Kyiv Municipal Hospital
Forskningsområden

Ämnesklassifikation (UKÄ) – OBLIGATORISK

  • Fysiologi
Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer8628
TidskriftScientific Reports
Volym7
Utgivningsnummer1
StatusPublished - 2017 dec 1
PublikationskategoriForskning
Peer review utfördJa