Neck vibration causes short-latency electromyographic activation of lower leg muscles in postural reactions of the standing human.

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T1 - Neck vibration causes short-latency electromyographic activation of lower leg muscles in postural reactions of the standing human.

AU - Andersson, Gert

AU - Magnusson, Måns

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - To study how quickly cervical proprioceptive information induced muscular responses in the lower leg to control posture in the standing human we investigated lower leg muscle electromyography and force-plate data from 10 healthy normal subjects, when perturbed by posterior neck muscle vibration. At the onset of vibration the tibialis anterior muscle was activated at latencies of 70-100 ms whilst the triceps surae muscle was inhibited at the same latencies. At offset the opposite pattern was observed. These findings suggest that a short-latency integrative system, rather than a direct reflex, mediates the cervical influence on posture. The short latencies also imply that activation of postural muscles in response to vibration towards the neck muscles occurs faster than would be expected if it was caused only by a perceptive illusion of movement.

AB - To study how quickly cervical proprioceptive information induced muscular responses in the lower leg to control posture in the standing human we investigated lower leg muscle electromyography and force-plate data from 10 healthy normal subjects, when perturbed by posterior neck muscle vibration. At the onset of vibration the tibialis anterior muscle was activated at latencies of 70-100 ms whilst the triceps surae muscle was inhibited at the same latencies. At offset the opposite pattern was observed. These findings suggest that a short-latency integrative system, rather than a direct reflex, mediates the cervical influence on posture. The short latencies also imply that activation of postural muscles in response to vibration towards the neck muscles occurs faster than would be expected if it was caused only by a perceptive illusion of movement.

U2 - 10.1080/000164802753648169

DO - 10.1080/000164802753648169

M3 - Article

VL - 122

SP - 284

EP - 288

JO - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

JF - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

SN - 1651-2251

IS - 3

ER -