Porewater Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in a Temperate and a Subtropical Seagrass System

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Porewater Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in a Temperate and a Subtropical Seagrass System. / Kindeberg, Theodor; Bates, Nicholas R.; Courtney, Travis A.; Cyronak, Tyler; Griffin, Alyssa; Mackenzie, Fred T.; Paulsen, May Linn; Andersson, Andreas J.

I: Aquatic Geochemistry, 16.05.2020.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

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Kindeberg, T., Bates, N. R., Courtney, T. A., Cyronak, T., Griffin, A., Mackenzie, F. T., Paulsen, M. L., & Andersson, A. J. (2020). Porewater Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in a Temperate and a Subtropical Seagrass System. Aquatic Geochemistry. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10498-020-09378-8

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Kindeberg, Theodor ; Bates, Nicholas R. ; Courtney, Travis A. ; Cyronak, Tyler ; Griffin, Alyssa ; Mackenzie, Fred T. ; Paulsen, May Linn ; Andersson, Andreas J. / Porewater Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in a Temperate and a Subtropical Seagrass System. I: Aquatic Geochemistry. 2020.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Porewater Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in a Temperate and a Subtropical Seagrass System

AU - Kindeberg, Theodor

AU - Bates, Nicholas R.

AU - Courtney, Travis A.

AU - Cyronak, Tyler

AU - Griffin, Alyssa

AU - Mackenzie, Fred T.

AU - Paulsen, May Linn

AU - Andersson, Andreas J.

PY - 2020/5/16

Y1 - 2020/5/16

N2 - Seagrass systems are integral components of both local and global carbon cycles and can substantially modify seawater biogeochemistry, which has ecological ramifications. However, the influence of seagrass on porewater biogeochemistry has not been fully described, and the exact role of this marine macrophyte and associated microbial communities in the modification of porewater chemistry remains equivocal. In the present study, carbonate chemistry in the water column and porewater was investigated over diel timescales in contrasting, tidally influenced seagrass systems in Southern California and Bermuda, including vegetated (Zostera marina) and unvegetated biomes (0–16 cm) in Mission Bay, San Diego, USA and a vegetated system (Thallasia testudinium) in Mangrove Bay, Ferry Reach, Bermuda. In Mission Bay, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) exhibited strong increasing gradients with sediment depth. Vertical porewater profiles differed between the sites, with almost twice as high concentrations of DIC and TA observed in the vegetated compared to the unvegetated sediments. In Mangrove Bay, both the range and vertical profiles of porewater carbonate parameters such as DIC and TA were much lower and, in contrast to Mission Bay where no distinct temporal signal was observed, biogeochemical parameters followed the semi-diurnal tidal signal in the water column. The observed differences between the study sites most likely reflect a differential influence of biological (biomass, detritus and infauna) and physical processes (e.g., sediment permeability, residence time and mixing) on porewater carbonate chemistry in the different settings.

AB - Seagrass systems are integral components of both local and global carbon cycles and can substantially modify seawater biogeochemistry, which has ecological ramifications. However, the influence of seagrass on porewater biogeochemistry has not been fully described, and the exact role of this marine macrophyte and associated microbial communities in the modification of porewater chemistry remains equivocal. In the present study, carbonate chemistry in the water column and porewater was investigated over diel timescales in contrasting, tidally influenced seagrass systems in Southern California and Bermuda, including vegetated (Zostera marina) and unvegetated biomes (0–16 cm) in Mission Bay, San Diego, USA and a vegetated system (Thallasia testudinium) in Mangrove Bay, Ferry Reach, Bermuda. In Mission Bay, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) exhibited strong increasing gradients with sediment depth. Vertical porewater profiles differed between the sites, with almost twice as high concentrations of DIC and TA observed in the vegetated compared to the unvegetated sediments. In Mangrove Bay, both the range and vertical profiles of porewater carbonate parameters such as DIC and TA were much lower and, in contrast to Mission Bay where no distinct temporal signal was observed, biogeochemical parameters followed the semi-diurnal tidal signal in the water column. The observed differences between the study sites most likely reflect a differential influence of biological (biomass, detritus and infauna) and physical processes (e.g., sediment permeability, residence time and mixing) on porewater carbonate chemistry in the different settings.

KW - Blue carbon

KW - Carbon cycling

KW - Carbonate chemistry

KW - Early diagenesis

KW - Estuarine processes

KW - Interstitial water

KW - Ocean acidification

KW - Sediment

U2 - 10.1007/s10498-020-09378-8

DO - 10.1007/s10498-020-09378-8

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85084825752

JO - Aquatic Geochemistry

JF - Aquatic Geochemistry

SN - 1380-6165

ER -