Report on improved use of individual metering concept

Forskningsoutput: Bok/rapportRapport

Abstract

In a low temperature district heating (LTDH) system the importance of well performing network and customer installations are essential due to reduced operation margins. The use of low-value waste heat in the production sets limitations on the supply temperature. New piping materials sets limitations on the supply temperature and the pressure level. All in all, this means an increased focus on ensuring that DH installations arewell performing.  This report is about ‘individual metering concepts’. The LTDH-system is monitored by direct connection to the heat meters at all the consumers. The data from the heat meters can be used as a basis for describing, predicting and analysing the system's performance for better control of production and operation, for better conditions for troubleshooting and maintenance of the grid and the customer installations as well as for better customer service.  The aim of this report is to:   give an overview over the current regulations for metering and billing of heat in Sweden and Denmark give an overview of desirable functionalities for DH meters and metering systems to provide input to applications that can be developed with the help of meter readings and which can be useful for the district heating industry 
describe how DH meter readings can be used for condition monitoring of service pipes and develop a method  for this  Regulations for metering and billing of DH follows EU regulations which says that all DH customers must be charged  according to actual consumption. The overview of the current regulations for metering and billing in Denmark and  Sweden shows that the two neighbouring countries have somewhat different approach to the individual metering  concept. In Denmark there is a long tradition of individual metering in multifamily buildings and the tenants heat  consumption is measured. In Sweden there is no such tradition and the individual metering concept generally is not in  focus. Instead, the property owner is the customer. Denmark follows the Energy Efficiency Directive from 2012  (supplemented 2018) that requires individual metering and charging. The Swedish regulations on metering and billing  are based on the exception in the EU regulation concerning individual metering and charging saying that individual  metering must be economically justifiable. The Swedish National Board of Housing has shown that implementation of  the EU regulations is not economically justifiable for the Swedish case ‐ neither for existing buildings or in new  buildings.  There is a general attitude that increased frequency and higher resolution of meter readings automatically results in  increased possibilities for new and improved analyses of customer performance. At present there are several  researchers and research groups that are using meter readings from DH customers and machine learning with the aim  to improve the energy performance of both the DH customer installations as well as the DH network and production  operation. From ongoing projects four areas for applications have been identified: Fault detection, Load prediction,  Production planning and Operational optimization. For these applications hourly meter readings are sufficient, at least  in combination with historical data and weather conditions. For improved fault detection algorithms and moving  towards fault diagnosis it would be beneficial to access secondary meter readings such as temperatures in the  secondary side heating‐ and domestic hot water system as well as indoor temperatures. When moving on towards  fault diagnosis, the frequency may also be in focus. A temporary shift to meter readings with higher frequency may be  necessary for diagnosis. All in all, it might not be the frequency of the meter readings that should be increased, it  might be more beneficial to include more meter parameters from the customer side of the heat exchanger. By  integration of more meter parameters, the focus may shift from a matter of frequency to the broad concept of  Internet of things (IoT).  One scope within this project was to evaluate the feasibility for usage of meter readings from customer installations to  detect increased heat losses in service pipes due to moisture. A theoretical study was carried out, but it did not turn  into a success. Results showed that even though the heat losses in the service pipe increases due to moisture content,  the impact on the measured parameters, that is temperature and flow, are low and would be hard to detect. A higher  resolution or increased frequency of meter readings would not improve the feasibility to use meter readings for  monitoring increased heat losses in service pipes since if feasible, it would require stable heat load at the customer  installation and stable and known temperature conditions in the DH network.   Through studies performed within this work and by other researchers it is clear that DH utilities, both in Denmark and  Sweden, has a desire to improve customer performance and to reduce the DH return temperature. A key factor for  success within this field is good customer relations and access to the customer’s DH substation. This may be a driving  force for DH‐utilities to offer service agreement and ICT‐platforms for greater customer engagement. Customers  seems to be more willing to take actions to improve their installations if they understand why it is important.  Recommendations:  The following recommendations are given based on the overall picture provided by the report's different compilations  and studies:   The meter should be able to measure the energy for every hour and be able to convert to measure with  higher frequencies (minutes). Some types of measurement data analyses may require a higher resolution  than hourly measurement, which is why the possibility of higher resolution should be provided, without that  being a default setting.   It should be possible to remotely upgrading the meters and to remotely change the meter frequency. This  will provide that new functionalities can be introduced in a cost‐efficient way and that expensive field visits  can be avoided.   Access to secondary meter readings. The following measurements were seen as the most important: Indoor  temperatures, secondary temperatures measured on branches for the heating system in the building, and  measurement on the district heating differential pressure. Measuring these parameters would be beneficial  for developing algorithms for fault detection and for improving system performance for the total district  heating system, as well as for as being able to guarantee the quality of energy supplies at the customer  substations.   There should be a digital interface that the end customers can use to access their energy consumption locally.  The communication solution should also support a future standard for communication with devices in the  home. In order to be of real use for the customers, this should be delivered with some kind of analysis tools  that can help the customers relate their consumption or data to reference data (for example historical data,  norms or set point values) and that can provide the customer with extended analysis that make sense to the  customer. 

Detaljer

Författare
Enheter & grupper
Externa organisationer
  • Kraftringen energi AB
Forskningsområden

Ämnesklassifikation (UKÄ) – OBLIGATORISK

  • Energiteknik

Nyckelord

  • district heating, Individual metering and billing, individual metering concepts, low temperature
Originalspråksvenska
FörlagCool DH
Antal sidor53
StatusPublished - 2019
PublikationskategoriForskning