Return to work after stroke: A Swedish nationwide registry-based study

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Return to work after stroke : A Swedish nationwide registry-based study. / Westerlind, Emma; Persson, Hanna C.; Eriksson, Marie; Norrving, Bo; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.

I: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, Vol. 141, Nr. 1, 2020, s. 56-64.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

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Westerlind, E, Persson, HC, Eriksson, M, Norrving, B & Sunnerhagen, KS 2020, 'Return to work after stroke: A Swedish nationwide registry-based study', Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, vol. 141, nr. 1, s. 56-64. https://doi.org/10.1111/ane.13180

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Westerlind, Emma ; Persson, Hanna C. ; Eriksson, Marie ; Norrving, Bo ; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S. / Return to work after stroke : A Swedish nationwide registry-based study. I: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica. 2020 ; Vol. 141, Nr. 1. s. 56-64.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Return to work after stroke

T2 - A Swedish nationwide registry-based study

AU - Westerlind, Emma

AU - Persson, Hanna C.

AU - Eriksson, Marie

AU - Norrving, Bo

AU - Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Objectives: A substantial proportion of individuals with stroke are of working age. After stroke, it is important to return to work (RTW), both for the individual's satisfaction with life and economically for society. The current comprehensive, long-term study aimed at investigating in what time period the RTW continues after stroke and what factors could predict RTW. Materials and methods: All individuals registered in the registry Riksstroke with stroke in Sweden at ages 18-58 years during 2011 were eligible for participation. RTW was based on sickness absence data from the Social Insurance Agency covering 1 year prestroke to 5 years post-stroke. Time to RTW was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves. Potential predictors of RTW were analyzed with Cox regression and logistic regression. Results: For RTW analyses, 1695 participants were included. Almost 50% RTW within 3 months, 70% within 1 year, and 80% within 2 years post-stroke. However, the RTW continued for several years, with a total of 85% RTW. Predictors of favorable time to RTW were male sex, ischemic stroke, and long university education compared with primary school education. Predictors of unfavorable times to RTW were higher stroke severity, defined by the level of consciousness, and older ages. Participants with self-expectations of RTW 1 year post-stroke had higher odds of RTW within 5 years. Conclusions: The RTW continues for a longer time after stroke than previously known. Both self-expectations and demographical, socioeconomic, stroke-related factors were important predictors of RTW. This knowledge could assist healthcare professionals to individualize the rehabilitation post-stroke.

AB - Objectives: A substantial proportion of individuals with stroke are of working age. After stroke, it is important to return to work (RTW), both for the individual's satisfaction with life and economically for society. The current comprehensive, long-term study aimed at investigating in what time period the RTW continues after stroke and what factors could predict RTW. Materials and methods: All individuals registered in the registry Riksstroke with stroke in Sweden at ages 18-58 years during 2011 were eligible for participation. RTW was based on sickness absence data from the Social Insurance Agency covering 1 year prestroke to 5 years post-stroke. Time to RTW was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves. Potential predictors of RTW were analyzed with Cox regression and logistic regression. Results: For RTW analyses, 1695 participants were included. Almost 50% RTW within 3 months, 70% within 1 year, and 80% within 2 years post-stroke. However, the RTW continued for several years, with a total of 85% RTW. Predictors of favorable time to RTW were male sex, ischemic stroke, and long university education compared with primary school education. Predictors of unfavorable times to RTW were higher stroke severity, defined by the level of consciousness, and older ages. Participants with self-expectations of RTW 1 year post-stroke had higher odds of RTW within 5 years. Conclusions: The RTW continues for a longer time after stroke than previously known. Both self-expectations and demographical, socioeconomic, stroke-related factors were important predictors of RTW. This knowledge could assist healthcare professionals to individualize the rehabilitation post-stroke.

KW - follow-up study

KW - rehabilitation

KW - return to work

KW - stroke

U2 - 10.1111/ane.13180

DO - 10.1111/ane.13180

M3 - Article

VL - 141

SP - 56

EP - 64

JO - Acta Neurologica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Neurologica Scandinavica

SN - 1600-0404

IS - 1

ER -