Room of silence: an explorative investigation of design students’ redesign of an arena for reflection and existential meaning-making

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Room of silence : an explorative investigation of design students’ redesign of an arena for reflection and existential meaning-making. / Petersson, Anna; Sandin, Gunnar; Liljas, Maria.

I: Mortality, Vol. 21, Nr. 2, 2016, s. 130-148.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Room of silence

T2 - Mortality

AU - Petersson, Anna

AU - Sandin, Gunnar

AU - Liljas, Maria

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This paper explores design students’ proposals for a redesign of the interior of a room of silence at the SUS hospital in Malmö. Reflection and existential meaning-making are discussed in relation to the material culture of design, and more specifically in relation to four different themes found among the students’ proposals: nature as common symbolic framework and salutary force; lighting creating a visual and spatial ambience for retreat; interactive objects allowing ritualised activities; and the presence and absence of religious symbols. In this paper, we argue that architecture and design more profoundly could support people with varying existential viewpoints when it comes to providing religiously and culturally shared public spaces for dealing with existentially crucial moments. We also argue for an interdisciplinary research approach to healing environments, where existential meaning-making is included in the overall discussion of the design of health care architecture.

AB - This paper explores design students’ proposals for a redesign of the interior of a room of silence at the SUS hospital in Malmö. Reflection and existential meaning-making are discussed in relation to the material culture of design, and more specifically in relation to four different themes found among the students’ proposals: nature as common symbolic framework and salutary force; lighting creating a visual and spatial ambience for retreat; interactive objects allowing ritualised activities; and the presence and absence of religious symbols. In this paper, we argue that architecture and design more profoundly could support people with varying existential viewpoints when it comes to providing religiously and culturally shared public spaces for dealing with existentially crucial moments. We also argue for an interdisciplinary research approach to healing environments, where existential meaning-making is included in the overall discussion of the design of health care architecture.

KW - architecture

KW - design

KW - existential meaning-making

KW - healing environments

KW - health care

U2 - 10.1080/13576275.2015.1046825

DO - 10.1080/13576275.2015.1046825

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 130

EP - 148

JO - Mortality

JF - Mortality

SN - 1357-6275

IS - 2

ER -