Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009

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Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009. / Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde; Böttiger, Blenda; Banner, Jytte; Hoffmann, Thomas; Nielsen, Lars Peter.

I: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 18, Nr. 1, 01.2012, s. 7-12.

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Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde ; Böttiger, Blenda ; Banner, Jytte ; Hoffmann, Thomas ; Nielsen, Lars Peter. / Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009. I: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 18, Nr. 1. s. 7-12.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009

AU - Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde

AU - Böttiger, Blenda

AU - Banner, Jytte

AU - Hoffmann, Thomas

AU - Nielsen, Lars Peter

PY - 2012/1

Y1 - 2012/1

N2 - The first human virus in the genus Cardiovirus was described in 2007 and named Saffold virus (SAFV). Cardioviruses can cause severe infections of the myocardium and central nervous system in animals, but SAFV has not yet been convincingly associated with disease in humans. To study a possible association between SAFV and infections in the human central nervous system, we designed a real-time PCR for SAFV and tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from children <4 years of age. SAFV was detected in 2 children: in the CSF and a fecal sample from 1 child with monosymptomatic ataxia caused by cerebellitis; and in the CSF, blood, and myocardium of another child who died suddenly with no history of illness. Virus from each child was sequenced and shown to be SAFV type 2. These findings demonstrate that SAFV can cause serious invasive infection in children.

AB - The first human virus in the genus Cardiovirus was described in 2007 and named Saffold virus (SAFV). Cardioviruses can cause severe infections of the myocardium and central nervous system in animals, but SAFV has not yet been convincingly associated with disease in humans. To study a possible association between SAFV and infections in the human central nervous system, we designed a real-time PCR for SAFV and tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from children <4 years of age. SAFV was detected in 2 children: in the CSF and a fecal sample from 1 child with monosymptomatic ataxia caused by cerebellitis; and in the CSF, blood, and myocardium of another child who died suddenly with no history of illness. Virus from each child was sequenced and shown to be SAFV type 2. These findings demonstrate that SAFV can cause serious invasive infection in children.

KW - Cardiovirus/classification

KW - Cardiovirus Infections/cerebrospinal fluid

KW - Central Nervous System Infections/pathology

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Fatal Outcome

KW - Feces/virology

KW - Female

KW - Genome, Viral

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Male

KW - Phylogeny

KW - Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

U2 - 10.3201/eid1801.110725

DO - 10.3201/eid1801.110725

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 7

EP - 12

JO - Emerging Infectious Diseases

JF - Emerging Infectious Diseases

SN - 1080-6040

IS - 1

ER -