Special Transportation Service in Sweden – Involvement of Private Operators.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Standard

Special Transportation Service in Sweden – Involvement of Private Operators. / Ståhl, Agneta.

I: Transportation Research Record, Vol. 1170, 1987, s. 35-38.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Special Transportation Service in Sweden – Involvement of Private Operators.

AU - Ståhl, Agneta

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - Since 1979, every municipality in Sweden has been able to offerits inhabitants Special Transportation Service (STS). STS has afirm primary-municipality connection and organization. Themunicipality, however, receives a national subsidy, which todayamounts to a maximum of 35 percent of a municipality'soverall costs for STS. In 1986, 5 percent of the Swedish populationwas entitled to Special Transportation Service. As thingshave developed, STS has become primarily a means of transportationfor the elderly. Every fifth person over age 65 isentitled, and the elderly constitute more than 85 percent ofentitlements nationwide. Travel by Special Transportation Servicehas increased greatly during the past 10 years. The overallcosts for the STS transportation in Sweden in 1986 were approximately$200 million. The nationwide average municipalcost for an STS trip in 1986 was $13. The cost range is wide,however, from a low cost of $6 to a high cost of $30. The rangein the costs for different municipalities is mainly a result of thevariations in policy among municipalities, such as prior reservationof a trip, obligatory collective travel, and the amount tobe paid by the entitled person. Because of the increased costs ofSTS travel, many municipalities have now started to review theorganization of STS. Until now the municipality has purchasedthe main part (95 percent) of the Special Transportation Servicefrom the taxi companies. Many municipalities, however,are now trying new solutions in providing transportation forthe elderly and disabled. In some municipalities, this has alreadyled to a declining role for the private sector's (taxis')Involvement in providing this transportation service. There areIndications that this development will continue in the future.

AB - Since 1979, every municipality in Sweden has been able to offerits inhabitants Special Transportation Service (STS). STS has afirm primary-municipality connection and organization. Themunicipality, however, receives a national subsidy, which todayamounts to a maximum of 35 percent of a municipality'soverall costs for STS. In 1986, 5 percent of the Swedish populationwas entitled to Special Transportation Service. As thingshave developed, STS has become primarily a means of transportationfor the elderly. Every fifth person over age 65 isentitled, and the elderly constitute more than 85 percent ofentitlements nationwide. Travel by Special Transportation Servicehas increased greatly during the past 10 years. The overallcosts for the STS transportation in Sweden in 1986 were approximately$200 million. The nationwide average municipalcost for an STS trip in 1986 was $13. The cost range is wide,however, from a low cost of $6 to a high cost of $30. The rangein the costs for different municipalities is mainly a result of thevariations in policy among municipalities, such as prior reservationof a trip, obligatory collective travel, and the amount tobe paid by the entitled person. Because of the increased costs ofSTS travel, many municipalities have now started to review theorganization of STS. Until now the municipality has purchasedthe main part (95 percent) of the Special Transportation Servicefrom the taxi companies. Many municipalities, however,are now trying new solutions in providing transportation forthe elderly and disabled. In some municipalities, this has alreadyled to a declining role for the private sector's (taxis')Involvement in providing this transportation service. There areIndications that this development will continue in the future.

M3 - Article

VL - 1170

SP - 35

EP - 38

JO - Transportation Research Record

JF - Transportation Research Record

SN - 0361-1981

ER -