The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation

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The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation. / Engelsberg, Karl.

Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, 2007. 139 s.

Forskningsoutput: AvhandlingDoktorsavhandling (sammanläggning)

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APA

Engelsberg, K. (2007). The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation. Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University.

CBE

Engelsberg K. 2007. The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation. Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University. 139 s.

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Engelsberg K. The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation. Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, 2007. 139 s.

Author

Engelsberg, Karl. / The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation. Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, 2007. 139 s.

RIS

TY - THES

T1 - The cultured neuroretina: development, survival and transplantation

AU - Engelsberg, Karl

N1 - Defence details Date: 2007-03-10 Time: 10:00 Place: Segerfalksalen External reviewer(s) Name: Kvanta, Anders Title: MD, PhD Affiliation: S:t Eriks Ögonsjukhus --- <div class="article_info">K Engelsberg, B Ehinger, J Wasselius and K Johansson. <span class="article_issue_date">2004</span>. <span class="article_title">Apoptotic cell death and microglial cell responses in cultured rat retina.</span> <span class="journal_series_title">Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol</span>, <span class="journal_volume">vol 242</span> <span class="journal_pages">pp 229-239</span>.</div> <div class="article_info">K Engelsberg, K Johansson and F Ghosh. <span class="article_issue_date">2005</span>. <span class="article_title">Development of the embryonic porcine neuroretina in vitro.</span> <span class="journal_series_title">Ophthalmic Res</span>, <span class="journal_volume">vol 37</span> <span class="journal_pages">pp 104-111</span>.</div> <div class="article_info">F Ghosh, K Engelsberg, R English and R Petters. <span class="article_issue_date"></span>. <span class="article_title">Long-term neuroretinal full-thickness transplants in a large animal model of severe retinitis pigmentosa.</span> <span class="journal_series_title">Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol</span>, (inpress)</div> <div class="article_info">K Engelsberg and F Ghosh. <span class="article_issue_date"></span>. <span class="article_title">Transplantation of cultured adult porcine full thickness retina.</span> <span class="journal_series_title">Cell Transplantation</span>, (inpress)</div> <div class="article_info">K Engelsberg, B Ehinger and F Ghosh. <span class="article_issue_date"></span>. <span class="article_title">The human embryonic retina in long-term culture.</span> (manuscript)</div>

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - In the cultured immature rat full-thickness neuroretina, massive apoptosis appears in the GCL within hours after explantation, but in the ONL cell death is low. Microglia cells become activated when the retina is kept in culture and are found in the GCL within 24 hours of culture. Embryonic porcine retina kept in culture can survive and develop according to its intrinsic timetable for at least six weeks in vitro. Short-term culture of embryonic donor tissue prior to transplantation does not seem to affect the differentiation and survival of the graft. A laminated graft can rescue rods in a large-animal model for severe retinitis pigmentosa. Adult porcine retina kept in culture displays early degenerative changes, but many of the cells can survive for several days in the culture environment. Retinas kept in culture for up to 1 day can survive transplantation. Human embryonic retinas can be kept in tissue culture for at least six weeks. They develop a partly laminated structure and several of the retina-specific neurons and glial cells.

AB - In the cultured immature rat full-thickness neuroretina, massive apoptosis appears in the GCL within hours after explantation, but in the ONL cell death is low. Microglia cells become activated when the retina is kept in culture and are found in the GCL within 24 hours of culture. Embryonic porcine retina kept in culture can survive and develop according to its intrinsic timetable for at least six weeks in vitro. Short-term culture of embryonic donor tissue prior to transplantation does not seem to affect the differentiation and survival of the graft. A laminated graft can rescue rods in a large-animal model for severe retinitis pigmentosa. Adult porcine retina kept in culture displays early degenerative changes, but many of the cells can survive for several days in the culture environment. Retinas kept in culture for up to 1 day can survive transplantation. Human embryonic retinas can be kept in tissue culture for at least six weeks. They develop a partly laminated structure and several of the retina-specific neurons and glial cells.

KW - Oftalmologi

KW - Ophtalmology

KW - transplantation

KW - development

KW - culture

KW - retina

M3 - Doctoral Thesis (compilation)

SN - 978-91-85559-19-8

PB - Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University

ER -