The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population: A Multivariate Study

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The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population : A Multivariate Study. / Ohlsson, Henrik; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina.

I: Twin Research and Human Genetics, Vol. 20, Nr. 4, 01.08.2017, s. 298-309.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

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TY - JOUR

T1 - The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population

T2 - A Multivariate Study

AU - Ohlsson, Henrik

AU - Kendler, Kenneth S.

AU - Lichtenstein, Paul

AU - Sundquist, Jan

AU - Sundquist, Kristina

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.

AB - Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.

KW - close family

KW - community

KW - externalizing syndromes

KW - family

KW - household

KW - shared environment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020203992&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/thg.2017.31

DO - 10.1017/thg.2017.31

M3 - Article

C2 - 28578747

AN - SCOPUS:85020203992

VL - 20

SP - 298

EP - 309

JO - Twin Research and Human Genetics

JF - Twin Research and Human Genetics

SN - 1839-2628

IS - 4

ER -