Timing and tempo of the Great Oxidation Event

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Timing and tempo of the Great Oxidation Event. / Gumsley, Ashley P.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Bleeker, Wouter; Söderlund, Ulf; de Kock, Michiel O.; Larsson, Emilie R.; Bekker, Andrey.

I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 114, Nr. 8, 21.02.2017, s. 1811-1816.

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Gumsley, Ashley P. ; Chamberlain, Kevin R. ; Bleeker, Wouter ; Söderlund, Ulf ; de Kock, Michiel O. ; Larsson, Emilie R. ; Bekker, Andrey. / Timing and tempo of the Great Oxidation Event. I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2017 ; Vol. 114, Nr. 8. s. 1811-1816.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Timing and tempo of the Great Oxidation Event

AU - Gumsley, Ashley P.

AU - Chamberlain, Kevin R.

AU - Bleeker, Wouter

AU - Söderlund, Ulf

AU - de Kock, Michiel O.

AU - Larsson, Emilie R.

AU - Bekker, Andrey

PY - 2017/2/21

Y1 - 2017/2/21

N2 - The first significant buildup in atmospheric oxygen, the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), began in the early Paleoproterozoic in association with global glaciations and continued until the end of the Lomagundi carbon isotope excursion ca. 2,060 Ma. The exact timing of and relationships among these events are debated because of poor age constraints and contradictory stratigraphic correlations. Here, we show that the first Paleoproterozoic global glaciation and the onset of the GOE occurred between ca. 2,460 and 2,426 Ma, ∼100 My earlier than previously estimated, based on an age of 2,426 ± 3 Ma for Ongeluk Formation magmatism from the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa. This age helps define a key paleomagnetic pole that positions the Kaapvaal Craton at equatorial latitudes of 11° ± 6° at this time. Furthermore, the rise of atmospheric oxygen was not monotonic, but was instead characterized by oscillations, which together with climatic instabilities may have continued over the next ∼200 My until ≤2,250-2,240 Ma. Ongeluk Formation volcanism at ca. 2,426 Ma was part of a large igneous province (LIP) and represents a waning stage in the emplacement of several temporally discrete LIPs across a large low-latitude continental landmass. These LIPs played critical, albeit complex, roles in the rise of oxygen and in both initiating and terminating global glaciations. This series of events invites comparison with the Neoproterozoic oxygen increase and Sturtian Snowball Earth glaciation, which accompanied emplacement of LIPs across supercontinent Rodinia, also positioned at low latitude.

AB - The first significant buildup in atmospheric oxygen, the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), began in the early Paleoproterozoic in association with global glaciations and continued until the end of the Lomagundi carbon isotope excursion ca. 2,060 Ma. The exact timing of and relationships among these events are debated because of poor age constraints and contradictory stratigraphic correlations. Here, we show that the first Paleoproterozoic global glaciation and the onset of the GOE occurred between ca. 2,460 and 2,426 Ma, ∼100 My earlier than previously estimated, based on an age of 2,426 ± 3 Ma for Ongeluk Formation magmatism from the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa. This age helps define a key paleomagnetic pole that positions the Kaapvaal Craton at equatorial latitudes of 11° ± 6° at this time. Furthermore, the rise of atmospheric oxygen was not monotonic, but was instead characterized by oscillations, which together with climatic instabilities may have continued over the next ∼200 My until ≤2,250-2,240 Ma. Ongeluk Formation volcanism at ca. 2,426 Ma was part of a large igneous province (LIP) and represents a waning stage in the emplacement of several temporally discrete LIPs across a large low-latitude continental landmass. These LIPs played critical, albeit complex, roles in the rise of oxygen and in both initiating and terminating global glaciations. This series of events invites comparison with the Neoproterozoic oxygen increase and Sturtian Snowball Earth glaciation, which accompanied emplacement of LIPs across supercontinent Rodinia, also positioned at low latitude.

KW - Great oxidation event

KW - Kaapvaal craton

KW - Paleoproterozoic

KW - Snowball earth

KW - Transvaal supergroup

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013422830&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1608824114

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1608824114

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 1811

EP - 1816

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

T2 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

SN - 1091-6490

IS - 8

ER -