Trait anxiety, working memory capacity, and the effectiveness of memory suppression

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Standard

Trait anxiety, working memory capacity, and the effectiveness of memory suppression. / Waldhauser, Gerd; Johansson, Mikael; Bäckström, Martin; Mecklinger, Axel.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 52, 2011, s. 21-27.

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskrift

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trait anxiety, working memory capacity, and the effectiveness of memory suppression

AU - Waldhauser, Gerd

AU - Johansson, Mikael

AU - Bäckström, Martin

AU - Mecklinger, Axel

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Trait anxiety, working memory capacity, and the effectiveness of memory suppression. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. We aimed at replicating the finding that humans are able to suppress unwanted memories, and tested whether this ability varies with individual differences in working memory capacity, trait anxiety and defensiveness. In a think/no-think experiment, participants either recalled or suppressed previously learned words for 0, 8 or 16 times. Suppression did not have an overall detrimental effect on later recall performance. However, higher recall rates after repeated suppression were exclusively predicted by higher trait anxiety. These results are discussed in relation to current theories on anxiety and executive control.

AB - Trait anxiety, working memory capacity, and the effectiveness of memory suppression. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. We aimed at replicating the finding that humans are able to suppress unwanted memories, and tested whether this ability varies with individual differences in working memory capacity, trait anxiety and defensiveness. In a think/no-think experiment, participants either recalled or suppressed previously learned words for 0, 8 or 16 times. Suppression did not have an overall detrimental effect on later recall performance. However, higher recall rates after repeated suppression were exclusively predicted by higher trait anxiety. These results are discussed in relation to current theories on anxiety and executive control.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9450.2010.00845.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9450.2010.00845.x

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 21

EP - 27

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Psychology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Psychology

SN - 1467-9450

ER -