Estimating the Legacy Effect of Post-Cutting Shelterbelt on Crop Yield Using Google Earth and Sentinel-2 Data

Yage Liu, Huidong Li, Minchao Wu, Anzhi Wang, Jiabing Wu, Dexin Guan

Forskningsoutput: TidskriftsbidragArtikel i vetenskaplig tidskriftPeer review

Sammanfattning

Shelterbelts (or windbreaks) can effectively improve the microclimate and soil conditions of adjacent farmland and thus increase crop yield. However, the individual contribution of these two factors to yield changes is still unclear since the short-term effect from the microclimate and the accumulated effect from the soil jointly affect crop yield. The latter (soil effect) is supposed to remain after shelterbelt-cutting, thus inducing a post-cutting legacy effect on yield, which can be used to decompose the shelterbelt-induced yield increase. Here, we develop an innovative framework to investigate the legacy effect of post-cutting shelterbelt on corn yield by combining Google Earth and Sentinel-2 data in Northeastern China. Using this framework, for the first time, we decompose the shelterbelt-induced yield increase effect into microclimate and soil effects by comparing the yield profiles before and after shelterbelt-cutting. We find that on average, the intensity of the legacy effect, namely the crop yield increment of post-cutting shelterbelts, is 0.98 ± 0.03%. The legacy effect varies depending on the shelterbelt–farmland relative location and shelterbelt density. The leeward side of the shelterbelt-adjacent farmland has a more remarkable legacy effect compared to the windward side. Shelterbelts with medium–high density have the largest legacy effect (1.94 ± 0.05%). Overall, the legacy effect accounts for 47% of the yield increment of the shelterbelt before cutting, implying that the soil effect is almost equally important for increasing crop yield compared to the microclimate effect. Our findings deepen the understanding of the mechanism of shelterbelt-induced yield increase effects and can help to guide shelterbelt management.

Originalspråkengelska
Artikelnummer5005
TidskriftRemote Sensing
Volym14
Nummer19
DOI
StatusPublished - 2022

Ämnesklassifikation (UKÄ)

  • Miljövetenskap
  • Jordbruksvetenskap

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